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   Info and pics for Scott McLarty's "Sit On It & Swivel"...

Hear all the tracks here
https://soundcloud.com/mclarty/sets/sit-on-it-and-swivel

Blanchard Nash  James Weaver  Jimmy Campbell  Michael Waldron  Sandra Timco

PJ Productions proudly presents:  The original cast recording of
SIT ON IT & SWIVEL 

A GAY MUSICAL COMEDY CABARET
Featuring:

Jimmy Campbell as The Preppy
Blanchard Nash as The Drag Queen
Sandra Timco as The Woman
Michael Waldron as The Businessman
James G. Weaver as The Leatherman
with

Piano -- Michael Leaman
Bass -- Mike McDannel
Percussion -- Brian Baverman

Original Music & Lyrics by Scott McLarty Book by G. Simpson & Betty LaMorte
ScottMcLarty@yahoo.com

Hi folks

In the mid 80s, I wrote songs for a musical show that opened in Cincinnati called Sit On It & Swivel. In spite of the silly title,
it was an authentic musical comedy that throughout 1985 and early 1986 toured through the Middle West and South, playing in cabarets,
theaters, and community centers in Columbus, Indianapolis, Covington, Lexington, Louisville, Nashville, and some towns in North Carolina
(those names I forgot because I didn't go to those shows). Mike Waldron, who now lives in Florida, was the producer of Sit On It & Swivel.

Fifteen years later, I'm not as pleased with some of the songs as I am with others. I recommend "Who's That Man?", "Another Long Night",
"Flawless", "You're Special" (the chorus, not the verse), "Look But Don't Touch", and "Are You Man Enough?".

"Who's That Man" is the best, in my opinion, and has the show's two strongest male voices. The musicians are good, so listen to the
overture, too. (That's Michael Leamon, not me, playing piano.) In "Once In A Dream", you can hear my voice briefly, singing a quiet,
ethereal chorus ("ah") underneath the soloist when he starts singing in falsetto.

I promised I'd write some commentary about the songs and about the production. Enjoy them, and write back and tell me what you think.

Before Swivel, I had done an Off-Broadway musical in New York, called The Brooklyn Bridge, in 1983. It ran for a month. After Swivel,
I wrote and had produced about a half dozen more shows in Cincinnati, and founded my own company, Diaphanous Features, producing original
musicals on grants from the City of Cincinnati and the Cincinnati Fine Arts Fund.

The last one was in 1992. One of these days I'll get a show going again somewhere.

Scott